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Study Links Sweetened Drinks to Increased Atrial Fibrillation Risk

A study suggests a possible link between consuming drinks with added sugar or artificial sweeteners and an increased risk of atrial fibrillation, highlighting the importance of reducing intake of such beverages for heart health.

At a glance

  • A new study suggests a possible link between consumption of drinks with added sugar or artificial sweeteners and increased risk of atrial fibrillation (AF).
  • Individuals who drank two liters of low-calorie drinks with sweeteners per week had a 20% higher risk of AF.
  • Drinking a liter of pure juice per week was associated with an 8% lower risk of AF.
  • The UK government recommends limiting sugar intake to 30g daily and avoiding sweetened beverages.
  • Despite findings, mechanisms linking sweetened drinks to AF risk remain unclear, emphasizing the need for further research.

The details

A new study suggests a possible link between the consumption of drinks with added sugar or artificial sweeteners and an increased risk of developing a heart condition known as atrial fibrillation (AF), which raises the risk of stroke.

The study, which analyzed data from 201,856 people in the UK Biobank, found that individuals who drank two liters of low-calorie drinks with sweeteners per week had a 20% higher risk of AF. In comparison, those who consumed beverages with added sugar had a 10% higher risk.

Interestingly, the study also found that drinking a liter of pure juice per week was associated with an 8% lower risk of AF. However, smokers who consumed more than two liters of sugary drinks per week had a 31% higher risk of AF. Notably, milk, tea, and coffee were not considered sweetened drinks in the study.

The UK government recommends

that adults have no more than 30g of sugar per day, highlighting the importance of reducing or avoiding artificially sweetened and sugar-sweetened beverages whenever possible.

Water is recommended as the best beverage choice, and cutting back on sugar-sweetened drinks is seen as a good way to reduce sugar intake and lower the risk of heart and circulatory diseases.

Despite these findings, the mechanisms linking sweetened drinks to AF risk remain unclear, and more research is needed to fully understand the health consequences of consuming such beverages.

During the 10-year follow-up period of the study, 9,362 cases of AF were reported, emphasizing the significance of this potential health concern.

In conclusion

while the study provides valuable insights into the potential risks associated with consuming sweetened drinks, further research is warranted to elucidate the underlying mechanisms and implications for public health.

Individuals must be mindful of their beverage choices and consider the impact on their overall health and well-being.

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Facts attribution

This section links each of the article’s facts back to its original source.

If you suspect false information in the article, you can use this section to investigate where it came from.

independent.co.uk
– Research suggests that drinks with added sugar or artificial sweeteners may be linked to an increased risk of developing a heart condition that raises the risk of stroke
– People who drank two liters of low-calorie drinks with sweeteners per week had a 20% higher risk of atrial fibrillation (AF)
– Those who consumed beverages with added sugar had a 10% higher risk of AF
– Drinking a liter of pure juice per week was associated with an 8% lower risk of AF
– The study recommends reducing or avoiding artificially sweetened and sugar-sweetened beverages whenever possible
– The UK government recommends adults have no more than 30g of sugar per day
– The study analyzed data from 201,856 people in the UK Biobank
– During the 10-year follow-up period, there were 9,362 cases of AF
– Smokers who drank more than two liters of sugary drinks per week had a 31% higher risk of AF
– Milk, tea, and coffee were not considered sweetened drinks in the study
– The mechanisms linking sweetened drinks and AF risk remain unclear
– More research is needed to understand the health consequences of sweetened drinks fully
– Water is recommended as the best choice for beverages
– Cutting back on sugar-sweetened drinks is a good way to reduce sugar intake and lower the risk of heart and circulatory diseases.

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