Science

18th-Century Shell Collection Returned to English Heritage from Captain Cook’s Voyage

A collection of 18th-century shells from Captain James Cook’s third voyage, saved from being discarded, has been returned to English Heritage and will be displayed at Chesters Roman Fort and Museum.

At a glance

  • An 18th-century shell collection from Captain James Cook’s third voyage saved from a skip has been returned to English Heritage.
  • The collection contains over 200 specimens, including an extinct species and shells believed to have been brought back from Cook’s voyage.
  • The collection was the passion of Bridget Atkinson, who amassed over 1,200 shells worldwide.
  • Around 200 artifacts from the collection were carelessly discarded in the 1980s, but the Buchanan family rescued them and donated them to English Heritage.
  • Notable shells in the collection include a thorny oyster, a sunburst star turban, a giant clam, and a chambered nautilus shell, which will be displayed at Chesters Roman Fort and Museum in Northumberland starting on March 13.

The details

An 18th-century shell collection from Captain James Cook’s third voyage has been returned to English Heritage after being saved from a skip.

The collection, containing more than 200 specimens, includes an extinct species and several believed to have been brought back from Cook’s voyage.

This collection was the passion of Bridget Atkinson, who amassed over 1,200 shells from across the globe.

Her grandson, John Clayton, inherited it before being sold in 1930.

In a tragic turn of events, around 200 of the artifacts from the collection were on display at Chester Roman Fort and Museum before they were carelessly thrown out in the 1980s.

Fortunately, Dr. John Buchanan rescued these shells from a skip, and the Buchanan family has generously donated them to English Heritage.

Notable Shells

The collection includes notable shells, such as a thorny oyster, a sunburst star turban, a giant clam, and a chambered nautilus shell.

These shells have been cherished and well-preserved for many years, and they will soon be put on display at Chesters Roman Fort and Museum in Northumberland starting on March 13.

Significance

The return and preservation of this valuable shell collection not only highlights the historical significance of Captain Cook’s explorations but also underscores the importance of safeguarding and appreciating cultural artifacts for future generations to enjoy and learn from.

Article X-ray

Sources
Facts attribution

This section links each of the article’s facts back to its original source.

If you suspect false information in the article, you can use this section to investigate where it came from.

independent.co.uk
– An 18th-century shell collection from Captain James Cook’s third voyage has been returned to English Heritage after being saved from a skip
– The collection contains more than 200 specimens, including an extinct species and several believed to have been sent back from Cook’s voyage
– The collection was the passion of Bridget Atkinson, who amassed more than 1,200 shells from across the globe
– The collection was inherited by her grandson, John Clayton, before being sold in 1930
– Some 200 of the artifacts remained on display at Chesters Roman Fort and Museum before being thrown out in the 1980s
– The shells were rescued from a skip by Dr John Buchanan and have now been donated to English Heritage by the Buchanan family
– Among the shells is a thorny oyster, a sunburst star turban, and a giant clam
– The collection also includes a chambered nautilus shell
– The shells have been kept safe and loved for many years
– The collection will go on display at Chesters Roman Fort and Museum in Northumberland from March 13

What's your reaction?

Excited
0
Happy
0
In Love
0
Not Sure
0
Silly
0

You may also like

Comments are closed.

More in:Science