AI

OpenAI CTO Discusses Sora Model Training Data and Copyright Issues

OpenAI CTO Mira Murati discusses the Sora text-to-video model in an interview with the Wall Street Journal, revealing the use of openly accessible data for training amid copyright disputes and ethical concerns surrounding the utilization of publicly available data for AI training.

At a glance

  • Mira Murati revealed that the data used to train Sora was openly accessible and licensed.
  • OpenAI is currently involved in copyright-related legal battles, including a lawsuit from the New York Times.
  • Google and Meta have admitted to using publicly shared content from platforms like YouTube, Facebook, and Instagram to train their AI models.
  • Ethical concerns surround the use of publicly available data for training generative AI models.
  • The debate continues on whether utilizing extensive publicly available data for AI training is ethically permissible or poses risks to privacy and intellectual property rights.

The details

OpenAI CTO Mira Murati recently sat down for an interview with Joanna Stern from the Wall Street Journal to delve into the intricacies of the Sora text-to-video model.

Murati disclosed that the data utilized to train Sora was openly accessible and licensed.

However, when pressed about whether Sora was trained on videos from YouTube, Facebook, or Instagram, Murati seemed to struggle to provide a definitive answer.

Legal Battles and Copyright Issues

It came to light that OpenAI is currently entangled in copyright-related legal battles, including a lawsuit from the New York Times.

This sheds light on the persistent copyright disputes surrounding generative AI technologies, a contentious issue that has been brewing for over a year.

The discourse extends beyond copyright matters to encompass concerns about trust and transparency in the utilization of training data.

Ethical Considerations

Interestingly, both Google and Meta have acknowledged using publicly shared content from YouTube, Facebook, and Instagram to train their AI models.

This raises crucial ethical considerations regarding the utilization of publicly available data for training purposes.

Some argue that generative AI models might encroach upon the efforts of content creators and pose a threat to specific industries.

The matter of training data is deemed fundamental in the advancement of generative AI technologies, with a lengthy history of data collection primarily for marketing and advertising objectives.

Nevertheless, apprehensions have been raised regarding the potential exploitation of user-generated content for commercial AI applications without sufficient awareness or consent from the public.

While companies like OpenAI, Google, and Meta may presently reap the benefits of employing publicly available training data, the long-term implications of such practices remain uncertain.

The debate persists on whether the utilization of extensive corpora of publicly available data for training AI models is ethically permissible or if it jeopardizes privacy and intellectual property rights.

This ongoing controversy underscores the necessity for enhanced transparency and responsibility in the development and implementation of AI technologies.

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venturebeat.com
– OpenAI CTO Mira Murati had an interview with Wall Street Journal’s Joanna Stern about the Sora text-to-video model
– Murati mentioned that the data used to train Sora was publicly available and licensed
– Murati struggled to answer questions about whether Sora was trained on YouTube, Facebook, or Instagram videos
– OpenAI is facing copyright-related lawsuits, including one from the New York Times
– Generative AI copyright battles have been ongoing for over a year
– The issue of training data is not just about copyright but also trust and transparency
– Google and Meta have confirmed using publicly shared YouTube, Facebook, and Instagram content to train their models
– The issue of training data is a foundational generative AI issue
– Data collection has a long history, mostly for marketing and advertising purposes
– Many feel that generative AI models have “stolen” their work and threaten their jobs
– There is a debate about whether using massive corpora of publicly available data for training models is fair game
– The public may not be aware that their social media content is being used to train commercial AI models.
– Companies like OpenAI, Google, and Meta may have short-term advantages in using training data, but long-term consequences are uncertain

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